Promo-Love Historical Novels? This One’s for You!

Can you imagine what it must be like to be the little sister of infamous English king, Henry VIII? Remember, this is the king who went on to have six wives, two of whom he had beheaded.

Promo-Love Historical Novels? This one’s for You!

KOBO is holding a promo between 24-28 January 2019 for Australia and New Zealand. So all you Aussie and Kiwi fiction and non-fiction fans here’s your chance to grab a bargain. Over 400 pages for only $2.99!

Here’s the novel that I’ve entered:

reluctant-queen-low-resolution-cover-516dd2jc7il-_sy346_

It’s Biographical Fiction and tells the story of Henry VIII’s little sister, Mary Rose Tudor.

Here’s the blurb:

RELUCTANT QUEEN: A TUDOR BIOGRAPHICAL NOVEL ABOUT HENRY VIII’s LITTLE SISTER

A very readable account of a fascinating woman who dared to stand up to Henry VIII and survived. It is thoroughly researched, admirably written and the author’s love of the Tudor period shines through.’ Historical Novels Review

 

Portrait of Mary Rose Tudor-Wikipedia

IMAGE OF MARY ROSE TUDOR WIKIMEDIA MaryTudor111 - Copy

Wasn’t she gorgeous?

One not about any of the six wives! Henry had plenty of other relatives, most of whom, given his short-lived dynasty and shaky right to the crown, the always insecure Henry had executed throughout his reign in order to secure his throne.

Can you imagine what it must be like to be the little sister of infamous English king, Henry VIII? Remember, this is the king who went on to have six wives, two of whom he had beheaded.

And although the teenage Mary Rose is his favourite sister (he even named his famous ship after her), his shifting alliances and ruthless desire to have his own way, made him push the young and lovely Mary into a hateful state marriage with the ailing and ancient King Louis XII of France.

But, a reluctant Mary Rose, as strong-willed as Henry and passionately in love, for the first time, doesn’t give in easily. Before agreeing to the match, after a relentless campaign to get her to say yes, by her loving brother, Mary Rose extracts a promise from Henry. A promise she is determined he will keep.

Very easy to read, very hard to put down. This made a Mary Tudor so accessible and relatable to the reader.’ READER REVIEW

Thoroughly enjoyable.’ READER REVIEW

Geraldine Evans also writes the Rafferty & Llewellyn Mystery Series and the Casey & Catt Mystery Series.

KOBO BOOKS: https://www.kobo.com/au/en/ebook/reluctant-queen

 

 

So you want to be a writer? II

Following on from my previous posting on this subject; let’s suppose you have now finished your novel. It’s gone through several drafts.You’ve checked, or had checked, the spelling, punctuation and grammar. You paid for a professional/begged a knowledgable friend, to critique it for you and have made the necessary changes.

You’ve printed it out. Read it through again. Noted the remaining typos that show up now you’ve printed the novel out again, corrected them and reprinted.

Hey! I think you might now be ready to send it out, if you want to go the traditional route. But if you don’t; if you fancy being an indie and put your book on Amazon’s Kindle, check out my post of formatting an ebook. There’s masses of information on the web. Please, please, don’t pay a firm of self-publishers to produce your book. It’ll cost you a fortune. And there’ll be strings attached. Oh yes, there’s always strings.

Amazon’s Kindle (https://kdp.amazon.com/ ), Kobo (www.kobowritinglife.com), Barnes & Noble’s Nook (www.barnesandnoble.com ) and Apple  ( www,apple.com/ibooks-author ) are all free. You can publish happily on any of them. If you don’t want the hassle of uploading directly, you can always use Draft2Digital (www.draft2digital.com). They will supply your book to all the usual retailers plus overdrive for libraries, and subscription services as well. All you have to do is upload a Word doc and you’re done!

To go the traditional route takes a long, long time. But if you’re certain that’s the route for you, how do you know who to send it to? Simple. You buy/borrow/steal (oops! not really) the necessary reference book. That will be Writers’ Handbook or Writers’ & Artists’ Yearbook in the UK. Writers’ Market in the US. And please get the latest edition as these people MOVE, darn ’em. A LOT.

Now you check through the listings, marking up and turning the corners of the pages of your pristine new book (yeah, I know, you hate to do that. Get some post-it notes, then, or similar), those agents/publishers who are interested in your particular type of book, be it mystery, history, romance, sci-fi, and so on. Then you check to see if the listing gives a name for the person who handles your genre and ring up the receptionist to make sure the editor hasn’t moved, gone mad or died. Be sure to check the correct spelling of their name. And you send them a letter, telling them a little about yourself and your book and whether you envisage it being the first book in a series and asking if they’ll consider reading your book, which you’ll describe (briefly) Try to make this letter no more than one page – you don’t want to inundate Ms/Mr Editor/Agent with your ramblings. That’s likely to piss Ms/Mr Ed off and she’ll put you on her ‘Avoid Like The Plague’, list. Make sure the grammar, punctuation and spelling are correct.

Then you repeat this letter to other editors/agents dealing with your genre, again ringing the firm to check the individual’s name. Do this step as many times as you can afford or till you run out of people. Don’t worry about multiple submissions. Who’s got the time to hang around while Ms Ed works her way through the slush pile of letters/submissions? The only thing you should allow to limit the number of your submission letters is time and/or money.

Then you wait. Probably for three months, maybe more. But you don’t spend the waiting time in idle contemplation of your navel. You get on with the next book. Yes, that’s right. More of the same. You don’t want to be a one-hit wonder, do you? In your spare time you can do a bit of networking to see if you can’t make acquaintance with a few editors/agents that you missed. Or even those you didn’t.

In what remains of your diminishing spare time, you get yourself a website organized.  www.wordpress.com is excellent. Your own Blog, too, would be helpful, the two are generally combined in the one site. And you are on Facebook, aren’t you? Tell me you Tweet. Social networking has helped me sell books; there’s no reason why it shouldn’t do the same for you. Putting the word out is simply preparing the ground for when you are published. Only post other things, too; interesting, amusing, useful posts that other people can forward on to their network of friends. It shouldn’t be all about you. The ‘Me, Me, Me’ posts will annoy people (wouldn’t they annoy you?) About 4 general posts to one book post or less. Preferably a lot less.

By the way. CONGRATULATIONS! You’ve got a book out to market. Well done! You’re clearly one of the doing writers, rather than one of the thinking about doing, writers.

Till next time and So You Want To Be A Writer III. When I’ll post about what happens if Ms Ed rejects you. And – even more important – what to do if she – GASP – accepts your book.