Tremendous Growth in the Sale of Self-pub eBooks in the UK

Did all you indies out there see this? And if you have a phobia about the number thirteen, you might be interested to note that this Guardian article appeared on Friday the 13th!

According to the latest information from Neilsen Book, sales of self-published titles in the UK increased by a massive 79% in 2013, with an estimated value of about £59 million over 18 million units sold. In spite of the book market as a whole reducing by 4% last year, the growth of the ebook market in the UK rose by 20%, around an estimated £50 million, of which around £26 million were self-pub books; Just over fifty per cent. How impressive is that?

The article also comments on which type of ebook sells best and to which age range: if your books appeal to women, either buying for themselves or for their children, you’re on to a winner!

Here’s the link if you want to read the rest:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jun/13/self-publishing-boom-lifts-sales-18m-titles-300m?utm_source=Publishers+Weekly&utm_campaign=a9e699575b-UA-15906914-1&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0bb2959cbb-a9e699575b-304500337

Okay, those figures might still be only a small percentage of the overall market, but it surely shows the way things are going.  I, for one, take enormous encouragement from this data and have no desire to scurry back to traditional publishing any time soon.

How about you?

And for those of you concerned that library loans of your books won’t translate into sales, here’s another article that should help to lessen that anxiety:

http://the-digital-reader.com/2014/04/13/uk-library-ebook-pilot-shows-library-loans-drive-sales/#.U51o2ihZhng

 

And, if you’re eligible for Public Lending Right income, it’s looking hopeful that legislation will shortly be enacted to make PLR payable on library loans of ebooks, as the UK Government intends to seek Parliament’s approval to allow rights holders to register their works from the 1st July 2014 to allow for payment in February 2016.

Here’s the link (click on ‘Government Response’): https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/consultation-on-the-extension-of-the-public-lending-right-to-rights-of-holders-of-books-in-non-print-formats

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BOOKBUB RESULTS

I took out a BookBub ad for Death Line #3 in my Rafferty and Llewellyn procedural series on 9 March 2014.

DEATH LINE AMAZON ECOVR FROM SELFPUBBOOKCOVERS New

I also entered it in Amazon’s Select programme and had four free days from 7 – 10 March 2014.

I chose to go with the free book option in the Mystery Category  (or, rather, my finances chose this option as the only one viable!).

Here’s the screenshot for 9 March, the day of my best ranking on amazon.com:

As you can see, Death Line reached a ranking of 2 Free Overall.

No 1 in Police Procedurals.

No 1 in British Detectives.

BESTSELLERS_AMZN_US_2_FREE_OVERALL_NO_1_POLICE_PROCEDURALS_NO_1_BRIT_TECS_2014-03-09_2247

There was an all-country total download of 46,882, with the US responsible for nearly all of it.

Here’s the country by country Amazon breakdown mid-morning on 11 March, one day after my freebie offer finished and two days after the BookBub ad:

I’ve made a few edits to make allowance for my woeful maths and general brain fatigue! I had originally mistakenly listed the paid sales as just for the book that was the subject of the Bookbub ad, when in fact it was for all books. Mea Culpa.

DEATH LINE FREE SALES ON 11 MARCH 2014 AFTER BOOKBUB AD ON 9 MAR 2014

COUNTRY                    FREE DOWNLOADS

AU                                             41

BR                                               2

CA                                            202

CO                                            495

COM                                     45,931 +1 BORROW

DE                                             152

ES                                                 5

FR                                                 6

IN                                                35

IT                                                   6

JP                                                   4

MX                                                 2

_____________________________________________________

TOTAL FREE DOWNLOADS  46,882

____________________________________________________

TOTAL PAID SALES ALL BOOKS BY 11 MARCH 2014:   472

THIS TOTAL COMPARES WITH AN ALL BOOKS PAID SALES RATE OF 272 (including 3 borrows) BY THE SAME DATE IN THE PREVIOUS MONTH.

This worked out as a Total Daily Sales Rate for all books of 42.90 on 11 March compared to a Total Daily Sales Rate of 24.72 on 11 February 2014. The Predicted Monthly Sales Rates were 1,330, compared to a Predicted Monthly Sales Rate of 766.54 and an actual February Sales Rate of 630 (I’ve had to pretend in the predicted figure that February had 31 days instead of only 28 to give a proper comparison).

In addition, the sales of the first and second in the series greatly increased and at mid-morning on 11 March had sales for the US totalling 152 for the first and 94 for the second in the series. Prior to the Bookbub ad sales for these two books were 11 and 8 respectively at 23.30 GMT on 7 March. Just over one a day.

So that would make the comparative Daily Sales of these books:

Dead Before Morning 13.81 on 11 March and only 1.57 on 7 March

Down Among the Dead Men 8.54 on 11 March and only 1.14 on 7 March.

I also made my very first sales of any sort to Brazil and Mexico and had only my second ever Japanese downloads.

Admittedly, we’re not dealing in enormous numbers of sales here; no J K Rowling, me! But the BB ad shifted an awful lot more books. I’m sure you’re able to work out what the percentage increase is (if you do, can you share? Never quite got to grips with percentages).

So, is a Bookbub ad worth it? Yes!

ARTICLE ON MY BLOG TOUR WITH HOST PEG BRANTLEY: HOW I CREATED MY EBOOKS

Here’s today’s post, with a ‘Thank you’ to Peg and Rhonda (see previous post) for hosting me.

If you’re interested in bringing out an ebook, you could do worse than read this. You’ll even learn how much it cost me! Here’s the link: