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Indie Author Coat of Arms!

Now we’re legit!

Thanks to Christine Plouvier who designed it, indie authors now have their own Coat of Arms.


Here’s the link to Christine’s original post (with thanks to Chris at thestoryreadingape blog).

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Tremendous Growth in the Sale of Self-pub eBooks in the UK

Did all you indies out there see this? And if you have a phobia about the number thirteen, you might be interested to note that this Guardian article appeared on Friday the 13th!

According to the latest information from Neilsen Book, sales of self-published titles in the UK increased by a massive 79% in 2013, with an estimated value of about £59 million over 18 million units sold. In spite of the book market as a whole reducing by 4% last year, the growth of the ebook market in the UK rose by 20%, around an estimated £50 million, of which around £26 million were self-pub books; Just over fifty per cent. How impressive is that?

The article also comments on which type of ebook sells best and to which age range: if your books appeal to women, either buying for themselves or for their children, you’re on to a winner!

Here’s the link if you want to read the rest:

Okay, those figures might still be only a small percentage of the overall market, but it surely shows the way things are going.  I, for one, take enormous encouragement from this data and have no desire to scurry back to traditional publishing any time soon.

How about you?

And for those of you concerned that library loans of your books won’t translate into sales, here’s another article that should help to lessen that anxiety:


And, if you’re eligible for Public Lending Right income, it’s looking hopeful that legislation will shortly be enacted to make PLR payable on library loans of ebooks, as the UK Government intends to seek Parliament’s approval to allow rights holders to register their works from the 1st July 2014 to allow for payment in February 2016.

Here’s the link (click on ‘Government Response’):


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All about the indie life v traditional publishing: See my article on the storyreadingapesblog

I wrote an article about my experiences both before and after I took up the indie author lifestyle for thestoryreadingapesblog. I enjoyed writing it and I’ve had some lovely, appreciative comments for my honesty (Rafferty’s family wouldn’t be impressed!). If you’re contemplating the indie life yourself, you could do worse than take a look. Here’s the link:


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New Rafferty & Llewellyn ebook: DEATH DUES #11 in the series

Just published!

Latest Rafferty & Llewellyn ebook. £0.77 / $0.99 / Euro 0.86

Bargain Price for two days only!

‘Evans writes clearly and realistically. The wry humour in the badinage between Rafferty and Llewellyn keeps the story moving.’


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A Rafferty & Llewellyn cozy procedural #11

With his wife-to-be’s wedding budget spiralling out of control and his superintendent demanding the swift resolution to the series of muggings of local loan sharks, DI Joe Rafferty is anticipating a long and trying week. And sure, enough, he isn’t disappointed.

 When one John ‘Jaws’ Harrison is found with his skull caved in, in an alleyway backing on to rundown Primrose Avenue while on his way to collect debt repayments from the residents, Rafferty and his intellectual partner, Sergeant Dafyd Llewellyn, imagine the case will be easily solved. Armed with a list of local debtors, they begin their investigations. But they hadn’t counted on the conspiracy of silence amongst the residents — most of whom had good reason to want Jaws dead.

 With the Super breathing down his neck and fiancée Abra sending his blood pressure to boiling point, Rafferty is forced to make some unorthodox decisions and stretch his intuitive powers to breaking point.



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I’ve been umm-ing and ah-ing about going totally indie for some time. But then when my publisher made it clear that they not only wanted the ebook rights to my just finished book but also to all of eight plus books that form my backlist with them, I rebelled.
I’ve always earned a subsistance income from my print books, but epublishing my early Rafferty and Llewellyn mystery novels convinced me that that didn’t have to be the case with ebooks. So, when it at last looked like I was going to start earning a living that took me up from poverty level, why should I willingly agree to sink back down?
Admittedly, it was a long, hard think. I’d been with my publisher the best part of ten years and they’d published twelve of my mystery novels. But seeing as they were intransigent and resistant to any attempts to negotiate on royalty percentages or price or frequency of payment, I also dug my heels in. Why, I asked myself, would I accept a 25% royalty rate when I could get 70% with amazon? Why would I accept twice-yearly royalty payments when amazon pays every month? And why would I be happy with books priced at $9.99 or above and which are unlikely to sell when I know from my own experience of publishing the earlier Rafferty books which were published by a different publisher, that a lower price equalled higher sales?
It was all a no-brainer. Yes, I felt a little disloyal. But weighed against that was how foolish I would feel accepting such a poor offer.
We’ve all read J A Konrath (A Newbie’s Guide to Publishing (see top of Blogroll to right). We’ve all learned a lot from his experiences and experiments in the ebook world and from those of his writing friends. JA, I’m grateful to you for all you’ve taught me. I’m not about to spurn all your hard-won knowledge.
So, as I said, I’m now officially an independent. Feel  free to support a poor author. Here are my amazon pages
Hats off to J A and hurrah for Indies everywhere. Long may we flourish. Monthly ebook sales now at over 700 and rising…
Hey, if it carries on like this, I might actually start to make a living.