goodreads

Goodreads Giveaway! Reluctant Queen: The Story of Mary Rose Tudor, Little Sister to Henry VIII

Enter my Goodreads Giveaway and be in with a chance of winning one of  ten pb copies of mReluctantQueenPODCOVEERFINALCROPPED FRONT ONLYy historical novel, Reluctant Queen. Ends 30 April 2014.

‘A very readable account of a fascinating woman who dared to stand up to Henry VIII and survived. It is thoroughly researched, admirably written and the author’s love of the Tudor period shines through.’ HISTORICAL NOVELS REVIE

GOODREADS GIVEAWAY Got to be in it to win it!

Ten copies of the paperback edition of my Tudor Historical Novel, RELUCTANT QUEEN: The Story of Mary Rose Tudor, the Defiant Little Sister of Infamous English king, Henry VIII.

Mary Rose Tudor, Henry VIII’s lovely little sister, reluctantly marries the aged and sickly Louis XII of France, a May to December state marriage, after a relentless campaign by her loving brother to get her agreement.

But Mary, deeply in love, for the first time, with champion of the lists Charles Brandon, extracted Henry’s promise that she could please herself for her second marriage.

At the French court, Mary endured the hateful embrace of her ancient husband, the ardour of Francis, the debauched, womanising heir-to-the-throne, as well as the hatred of Louise of Savoy, mother to Francis, who feared her lusty son would succeed in fathering his own usurper.

With the death of Louis, and Francis’s elevation to the French throne and absolute power, her situation became desperate. Captive prey to Francis’s determined passion for her, fearful of rumours that her brother would break the promise he made to her, would Mary Rose ever be free to go to her lost love?

Paperback Publication date: 1 May 2014.

ENTER NOW! Entry open from 27 February to 30 April 2014. Here’s the link to the giveaway page: https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/83791-reluctant-queen-the-story-of-henry-viii-s-defiant-little-sister

So You want to be a Writer III

And So To Market!

Well! You’ve been and gone and done it! Got your book accepted, I mean. That’s great. Many, many congratulations. Celebrate. Go on, you deserve it. You’ve just accomplished something that hundreds, if not thousands of people attempt.

But once the celebrations are over, it’s time to get down to work. Apart from starting on your second book (you are, aren’t you?), you’ve got some more hard work to do. Unless your agent and editor think you’re going to be a bestseller, they won’t offer much in the way of marketing, so you’ll have to do it. Of course, you might have enough cash to pay a publicist to do it for you (lucky you!). But if not, the following are the sorts of things you’ll have to do:

Get yourself a Facebook Page and make friends, as many as you can manage. I don’t mean the ordinary Family and Friends page, this is a Page with a capital P, where you can post about all the amazing things that are happening since you became a soon-to-be author. Mention your book – not so much that people’s eyes glaze over when they see a post from your Page, but perhaps once or twice a week.and ask for reviews once it’s published, providing the link to the book’s page on amazon.

Send out postcards about your book as soon as you have the artwork of the book jacket. Google bookstores and libraries and anyone else you can think of who might do you some good and send them one of your postcards. Put the cover of your book on the postcard along with details of publisher, price, where to buy, your website (you have got one, haven’t you?) and a brief synopsis of the book. Add any reviews you’ve received to the address side of the postcard.

Create, or get a printer to do them for you, flyers and bookmarks to hand out when you give talks about how you wrote your book, your life as a writer, your journey to publication, whatever.

Create a blog (http://www.blogger.com/. It’s free) and post regularly once or twice a week.

Join crimespace, librarything, linkedin, theredroom goodreads and post your bio and details of your book.

Don’t forget to ask your friends and family to buy it. You’ll only receive six or so free copies, perhaps ten if it’s a pb, so be mean with them. Don’t hand one out to anyone who asks, though you’ll have to give one to your other half and perhaps your mum. Make the rest buy a copy.

Ask your local bookstores if you can do a signing. And if you get a ‘yes’, don’t just sit at the table waiting for customers. Wander round the store and hand out bookmarks and flyers. Chat to people. Be as friendly as you know how and some of them might just buy your book. If you’ve got the free time and can afford the travel expenses, ask for signings further afield, too.

If you can afford to buy however many more copies of your book, contact reviewers (newspapers, magazines, online) and ask if they’ll review your book. If so, parcel it up and send it off.

What else? Can’t think of anything else for now. But you’ve got plenty to be getting on with.

And for those of you who received a rejection – take heart. Writing’s a marathon, not a sprint. You’ll get there. It’s just going to take a bit longer. Maybe the next day’s post will bring a show of interest from one of those many editors/agents you wrote to. It only takes one. Meanwhile, for a bit of fellow-feeling with other rejected authors, go my my website (http://www.geraldineevans.com/) and click Links, then scroll down and find Rejection Collection (that’s what it’s called if I remember rightly) and read about what other rejected authors have received. It just might make you feel a bit better. If not, what are you waiting for? Get on with the next book. There’s nothing like it for stopping the tears. And it would be good to be able to say you’re working on the follow-up when you do get that spark of interest from Miss Ed. Go to it!

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The Author

Geraldine Evans is a British writer of police procedurals that contain a lot of humour and family drama Her15-strong Rafferty & Llewellyn series features DI Joe Rafferty, a London-Irish, working-class, lapsed Catholic, who comes from a family who think - if he must be a policeman - he might at least have the decency to be a bent one. Her 2-strong Casey & Catt series features DCI 'Will' Casey, a serious-minded, responsible policeman, whose 'the Sixties never died', irresponsible, drug-taking, hippie parents, pose particular problems of the embarrassing kind.

AUTHOR MEMBER: ALLi

The Alliance of Independent Authors — Author Member