article on writing

All about the indie life v traditional publishing: See my article on the storyreadingapesblog

I wrote an article about my experiences both before and after I took up the indie author lifestyle for thestoryreadingapesblog. I enjoyed writing it and I’ve had some lovely, appreciative comments for my honesty (Rafferty’s family wouldn’t be impressed!). If you’re contemplating the indie life yourself, you could do worse than take a look. Here’s the link:

http://wp.me/p3mGq7-1QU

 

So you want to be a writer…?

So you want to be a writer? Fine. We won’t talk about whether the idea of loads of money sparked your desire, even though it’s a fallacy that all authors earn megabucks. They don’t. Take it from me. No author will sell well if no one’s heard of him/her. And most likely no one will hear of you unless your publisher decides you’re going to be a bestseller. You’ll get minimal marketing. If you want to be marketed you’ll have to do it yourself via a website, a blog, postcards, bookmarks, flyers, newsletters, talks, Author Pages on book websites. All while holding down a full-time job, bringing up the kids, doing the shopping, cooking cleaning, whatever. And that’s always assuming you actually get published. Because, as all you would-be writers out there know, getting published’s the first hurdle.

So what do you do? I can’t say I went the obvious route of joining writers’ circles and book clubs and the like. I have been a member of writers’ circles, but I didn’t find them that helpful when it’s a novel that you need to be critiqued. Novels are too long to be critiqed at your average writers’ circle meeting. Think about it: you’re one of maybe a dozen at the once-a-month critique meeting and have to take your turn. So you’ll be able to read no more than a single chapter. Spread that out over how many chapters are in the book and you see the difficulty. Who the hell remembers what happened in the earlier chapters by the time they get to the last one? Of course, if you show your face often enough and make friends, you might persuade one or two other members to read your book in its entirety. But it’s still not a very satisfactory way of finding out where your work needs improvement. And it will need improvement. Believe me.

So what do you do? Well, once you’re sure you’ve got the fundamentals of line spacing, page spacing, spelling and grammar sorted out, it’s time to try the professional criticism route (details of who provides these services can be found in either the Writers’ Handbook or the Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook). A good professional criticism service is worth its weight in gold and will provide a detailed crit and tell you where your plotting, characterisation, storytelling, etc has gone astray. And though such services are expensive, they’re worth it. You’re paying for expert advice, so of course it doesn’t come cheap. It’s what made all the difference for me. I might have mentioned before on this blog that, if it hadn’t been for such professional advice, I might still be bemoaning my fate as an unpublished author. But I don’t think it’s a thing that can be stated too frequently.

I’d written a book a year for six years, all romances, and all aimed at the Mills & Boon market. All while I had a full-time job and household chores to do, too. And all but the last one received nothing but rejections. That last one was Land of Dreams, a romantic novel set in the Canadian Arctic. And while I was finally published, my next romance offering was rejected.

It was when I switched to writing crime novels that I first started paying for a professional crit. And it paid off because that first crime novel, Dead Before Morning, was taken from Macmillan’s slush pile and published (1993). It was only the second time I’d sent it out, so as you can imagine, I was thrilled. It was also published in the States, in hardback and paperback and, as it’s a backlist book, I’m now in the process of publishing it on kindle. It even sparked interest in a Los Angeles film producer! That came to nothing, alas, but it was exciting while it lasted.

Maybe you’ve taken my advice and paid for a professional critique and still got rejected. Have you asked yourself whether you’re chasing a dying trend? Different types of books are hot at different times and then fade till no editor wants them. Maybe, if you’ve had nothing but rejections on your current project, you should put it away and start again. Most first books are unpublishable. Writing’s a trade and needs to be learned. And no trade is learned overnight. And when you start again, do so with the book you actually want to write rather than the one you think you ought to write. Believe me, when you’re writing from the heart, about characters and themes you care about, it shows.

That’s it! Lecture over. I hope you’ve found my observations helpful. If not, and you’re still getting rejected, buy yourself a big, fat jokebook, one with a section on writers’ woes and you’ll at least see that you’re not alone. Persevere, as nearly all published writers had to do and if yours is a true vocation, you’ll get there.

Article on Writing

I’ve just written this short article on writing for one of crime author, Pauline Rowson’s, blogs (advice for writers). Perhaps you’ll find it helpful, also, if you’ve written a book that has received nothing but rejections. Check it out below:

Start Counting the Money, Honey
by
Geraldine Evans
Author of the Humorous Rafferty & Llewellyn and Casey & Catt crime series

Del Boy of Only Fools and Horses fame, always said: ‘By this time next year, we’ll be millionaires’. Perhaps that’s your belief, too – if only you could get someone to read your book. Maybe it’ll happen, too. After all, you’ve done all the usual things. You’ve penned the Letters to the Editor, subscribed to writers’ magazines, joned the local Writers’ Circle and received your first rejection letter. Or maybe more than one…

Perhaps it’s time to consider having your work professionally criticized?

Yes, I know it’s expensive. I know the critique might be wounding to your ego, but so are all those rejections. It could well be the step forward you need. I doubt if I would have got published but for the advice I received after finishing Dead Before Morning, the first novel in what went on to become a series (Rafferty & Llewellyn). I’m currently fourteen books into the series, having just finished Deadly Reunion. It’s possible I would still be that forlorn and struggling wannabe without their help.

Unfortunately, the criticism service I used seems to have vanished off the radar, but if you check the Links Page on my website (www.geraldineevans.com), you’ll find the names of two reputable firms. And if you buy the latest writers’ bibles (Writers’ Handbook and Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook), you’ll find a lot more.

Yes, I know, you can get a critique from your friends at your writing circle, but I don’t think that’s the most suitable area for a book critique. Think about it. It could take a year (or two) for you to read out the entire book and by the time the last monthly critique meeting comes by, the other members will have forgotten most of the first half of it.

So, if you’re frustrated and yearn to have your book read in pretty quick fashion by someone in the know, think about having that professional critique. As Del Boy would say: ‘You know it makes sense’.

ends

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The Author

Geraldine Evans is a British writer of police procedurals that contain a lot of humour and family drama Her15-strong Rafferty & Llewellyn series features DI Joe Rafferty, a London-Irish, working-class, lapsed Catholic, who comes from a family who think - if he must be a policeman - he might at least have the decency to be a bent one. Her 2-strong Casey & Catt series features DCI 'Will' Casey, a serious-minded, responsible policeman, whose 'the Sixties never died', irresponsible, drug-taking, hippie parents, pose particular problems of the embarrassing kind.

AUTHOR MEMBER: ALLi

The Alliance of Independent Authors — Author Member

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